rapidwords.net

Shilluk (aka Cøllø)

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Ethnocode: 
shk [Shilluk]
Word collection dates: 
Monday, 17 August, 2015 to Saturday, 29 August, 2015
Total days: 
11
Location: 
Juba, South Sudan
Total participants: 
64
Avg daily participants: 
55.0
Avg hours/day: 
5.8
Avg participant groups: 
6.0
Avg Participants per group: 
7.5
Total domains treated: 
1792
Total raw words collected: 
15117
Local context: 
The workshop was held on the SIL compound in Juba, South Sudan. The Cøllø (Shilluk) home area is a war zone at this time, so many of them have relocated to Juba. The participants arranged their own transportation to and from the SIL compound each day and were compensated for that cost. A light breakfast was served at the start of the day and a full lunch was provided for all participants. In addition, each participant received a stipend in thanks for his/her contribution.
% Words glossed: 
80
% Words entered: 
38
Software used: 
FLEx 8.1.4

The fact that the Cøllø people have relocated to the capital city, due to the fighting in their home area, made it relatively easy to find enough speakers in Juba to hold the workshop. Many of the potential participants were employed in Juba, so not all of them were able to obtain permission from their employers to take part in the workshop. The uncertainty of exactly who would be available made it difficult to assign individuals who would actually be present to take on the most important roles. This made for a rocky start on the first day of the word-collection phase, but once those details were ironed out, the group made good progress each day.

As in most of our workshops to date, the glossers had diffculty keeping up with the productivity of the word-collection groups and usually had a significant backlog of folders waiting to be glossed. The typists, too, were few in number, and one of them was unable to stay for the entire time, so quite a lot of work remained to be done on data entry when the workshop came to a close.

The consultants-in-training were unable to stay past the end of the word-collection phase, due to another commitment the following week, so there was no official clean-up week. One of the typists simply continued working at entering data after the end of the workshop.

Enthusiasm was quite high, as was attendance. The organizers not being sure how many would actually come, they invited many more than the minimum of 18 language experts, and most of those who were invited actually came and kept coming. So the average size of each word-collection group was 7 or 8 people.